Hurdling the American Muslim Challenge, by Imam Luqman Ahmad

One thing that we must keep in mind is that we are a diverse community; however, that diversity is only a virtue if we navigate it correctly by coming together.


American Muslims have perhaps the best chance to alter the narrative of rage, extremism, tribalism, and Muslim on Muslim killing that’s been going on in the Muslim world. We have among us, Muslims from all over the world, from all cultures, backgrounds, languages, and math’habi or theological leanings. We have it within our grasp to change the status quo of sectarianism, intra-religious hostility, and classism based upon race, and ethnicity. In addition to that, we have the freedom to practice our faith, the freedom to dialogue in sincerity, to freedom to employ critical discernment in addressing our problems, and we have the freedom to make important decisions about what we want our future to look like. We should do everything possible not to waste this opportunity.

I’m not saying that it will be easy; but I do believe that it is well within the realm of possibility. However, it will require that we address issues of race, racism, ethnic separation, and religious sectarianism within our own ranks. It will also require that we learn to respect each other’s differences, cultures and social norms, and not impose upon each other practices that have been added to the religion that were not from it originally. One thing that we must keep in mind is that we are a diverse community; however, that diversity is only a virtue if we navigate it correctly by coming together. American Muslims have done extremely well in adjusting to a multi-cultural society and to get along with their neighbors, co-workers and fellow citizens. We just need to transfer that success to the way we deal with each other.

The biggest hurdle by far I think will be to reconcile between immigrant and indigenous American Muslim communities. People don’t like to admit it but we are still living with the tale of two Muslim Americas; one, made up of indigenous American converts and second generation Muslims, and the other, immigrant communities who by and large view indigenous American Muslims, most of whom are African-American, as subordinates. We don’t like to talk about this or even acknowledge it; nevertheless relations amongst the two groups of Muslims need work.

The very first snapshot of the Muslim community was not only multi-racial, it was egalitarian, as characterized in the hadith of Ammar; “I saw Allah’s Apostle and there was none with him but five slaves, two women and Abu Bakr”[1] (i.e. those were the only converts to Islam then).[2] The Prophet had little regard for anyone’s race, social status, wealth, ethnicity, influence, looks, physical prowess or defects when it came to his choice of associates, and neither should we. He preferred the company of the believers whomever they happened to be, and he valued those who possessed good character.

We have to be concerned not just about the future of Islam, but the future of Islamic civilization as we know it, and have to realize just what it is that we as Muslims have to offer to the world. Muslims all over the world are dependent upon the west; for technology, for military armaments and advanced weaponry, for systems management, for advanced education and for industrial advance.  The greatest asset that Muslims have to offer the world is Islam, that is, if we decide to believe in it, practice it and apply its moral principles to the emerging world civilization. I’m not talking about Taliban, or Salafi style imperialism here. I’m talking about the greater Islamic ideal of moral fortitude, justice, egalitarianism, and human rights.

Muslims must embrace the theory of Islamic idealism based upon justice, fairness and righteousness and apply it to our emerging civilization. We must demonstrate our ability to not only get along with each other but to work together a people of faith, as partners, and not as masters versus subordinates. Moral action during the Prophet’s time (SAWS) began with social justice at home and amongst your own people; it’s an idea whose time has come. Let us begin now. .

Imam LuqmanAhmad

American born Imam, Luqman Ahmad has been serving since 1996 is the Imam and Executive Director of a Northern California Mosque, [Masjid Ibrahim Islamic Center]. He is a classically trained Imam who is a graduate of Omdurman Islamic University in the Sudan and has also studied at Umm al-Qura University in Mecca Saudi Arabia. He a memeber of NAIF [North American Imam’s Federation], a founding member of COSVIO [Council of Sacramento Valley Islamic Organizations] and a prominent and active member of the Sacramento Muslim community. He can be reached @ imamabulaith@yahoo.com., or read his blog @ imamluqman.wordpress.com.


[1] Collected by Bukhaari.

[2] Collected by Bukhaari.

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2 thoughts on “Hurdling the American Muslim Challenge, by Imam Luqman Ahmad”

  1. This issue has been closeted and sat dormant for too long, and as a consequence it has grown in strength. If this sickness is not broach with vigor and determination, it may become insurmountable. I think we underestimate the destructive potential of racism, xenophobia to the Ummah. As a microcosm of this American experiment, we are a diverse patchwork of Muslims that has have been offered a worthy promise, to become a beacon, an example to the rest of the Muslim world. Our ambivalence and cowardice in responding to this scourge will only continue to nurture this monster.

    As an American Muslim of African descent, I’m astonished and disappointed by the ignorance of the majority the immigrant Muslims about our story. That they was an earnest attempt to maintain Islam whilst under the yoke of chattel slavery. That since the early 20th century, they were vibrant Muslim communities that valued and followed the Sunnatul Muhammad(SAW); they would even send Sadaqat to the Arabian peninsula. And how our struggles have has been a catalyst to many of the successes of the immigrant community. And that our historic struggle for civil rights will be invaluable in combating the current onslaught of Islamaphobia.

    How can we expect to combat prejudice with our own dirty hands? Racism is antithetical to Islam; they cannot coexist.

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