Advice for Muslim Brothers Who Still Want to Run the Streets, by Imam Luqman Ahmad

[There is hardly anything more unbecoming of manhood, than a grown man, who is married with children, still running the streets, kicking it with his homies]. -Imam Luqman Ahmad-

North philly
A lot of brothers still want to hang in the streets. I understand the lure of the streets. Lights, cameras and action, and maybe a few dollars here and there, but the problem is, many brothers are getting caught up, beaten down, and eaten alive up by the streets. The streets will chew you up, and spit you out, and won’t even remember your name. It will turn you into a number, and have your butt writing letters from a jail cell, and wearing an orange jumpsuit for the rest of your life, or at least for a big chunk of it.
Sometimes the streets will just take you down like you just a mere statistic, and the next thing you know, you’re in a casket with the choir singing, and the Pastor, praying to Jesus (AS) over you, talking bout you was saved. If you’re fortunate, the brothers will get a hold your body, lower you in the ground like a Muslim, and make du’aa for you, all the while, feeling some kind of way, because the Prophet (SAWS) said; “each servant will be raised (on the Day of Judgment) upon what he died on”.[Muslim]

Sometimes, Allah just turns you into a living example of someone who plays with the deen and you be one of those dudes walking around, shuffling his feet, mumbling, and talking to himself. Or you’ll end up as a joker; one of those has been dudes, who lost your wife, your kids and your family, completely broken down, of no benefit to nobody, and still can’t even say the Faaitiha correct. Don’t say it doesn’t happen because I have seen it with my own eyes.

Any Muslim man who is afraid of taking on the responsibility of marriage and parenthood, cannot reasonably be depended upon in hardly anything in the way of establishing this deen. Too many brothers use the religion of Islam as a game, without realizing the damage they are doing to the ummah, and to successive generations. it is one thing to be unable, it’s another thing to be a coward, or a P.A.N.; and we all know what a P.A.N. is.
So lemme tell you something brothers; there is a big difference in being in the streets, getting your halal hustle on when necessary, and being a joker, calling himself Muslim, hanging in the streets, kicking it wit da homies. Nothing wrong with gettin the grind on, and sometimes, there is no other choice but that. However, when those demons in the streets start to follow you back home, and wreak havoc in your family, many times destroying it, that ain’t cool. If a brother gonna be in the streets like that, he better know how to find a masjid for Jum’ah and be able to shake and move, so he’s not bringing the streets home to where he lays his head, and where his wife and children live.

Some brothers trek out into the street and come back with diseases and illegitimate babies. Sometimes they say they are heading to the store for milk and cereal and come back on bail. Lots of times, brother simply get stuck in quicksand. Some parts of the streets are where, once you step in it, you ain’t coming back home. I can’t tell you how many brothers were dippin and dabbin in the streets and got snared and never made it back on Siraatul Mustaqeem. Some of them we’ve had to go see behind bars, and there are still others, we had to end up doing a janaazah over them. I come from the old school; Muslim men ain’t got no business running the streets for nothing. They shouldn’t be rolling with the unbelievers on the block, and kicking it with them like they’re bosom buddies, unless you are doing straight up da’wah cuz, birds of a feather, flock together. Or better still, the Prophet (SAWS) said: “a person is on the deen of his close friend”.

You should only really warn he who follows the Message and fears the (Lord) Most Gracious, unseen: give such a one, therefore, good tidings, of Forgiveness and a Reward most generous”. (Quran, 36:11)
Bottom line; If you wanna rub shoulders with the kuffaar on the block, and kick it with them, then you should be prepared to give them straight up, hard core, da’wah to Islam. Straight up da’wah means that you drop the truth on them, without watering it down, and you keep it movin. Hardcore, means that if they take the da’wah, and want more, you put him on your hip, drop more word on him, and get him on your program, and give him the glad tidings. If they don’t take the da’wah, don’t want to listen, think it’s a joke, or are just not ready, you keep it movin, take care of your business, swing by the Masjid for Ishaa, and head home. That’s how Muslim men supposed to get down when it comes to the streets.

If you are a grown up, married man, and you still insist on hanging in the street, just chillin, doing nuthin, then check this out; The Prophet said, “Beware! Avoid sitting on the roads.” They (the people) said, “O Allah s Apostle! We can’t help sitting (on the roads) as these are (our places) here we have talks.” The Prophet said, ‘ l f you refuse but to sit, then pay the road its right ‘ They said, “What is the right of the road, O Allah’s Apostle?” He said, ‘Lowering your gaze, refraining from harming others, returning greeting, and enjoining what is good, and forbidding what is evil.” [Bukhaari]. If you are addicted to street life, then at least have a purpose.
This is what we teach: You roll like this; Home, work, and Masjid. Outside of that; everyday errands, visit some family, get out to handle necessary business, a little halal recreation now and then, school, if you’re on that mission, occasional dates time with the wife, and then back home with the family. It ain’t even that complicated.

Imam Abu Muhammad Luqman Ahmad
Masjid Ibrahim Islamic Center, Sacramento California.

imamluqman@masjidibrahim.com

77 principles from the Quran and the Sunna, that supports stability in your life. By Imam Luqman Ahmad.

Dear beloveds, these are tough times that we live in. many families are in turmoil. Drug abuse, incarceration, spousal abuse, family and moral dysfunction, ignorance of religion, wanton violence and killing, fanaticism, marital discord, social instability, emotional baggage, juvenile delinquency, and hardened hearts are plaguing our communities in the United States.  Many of these things are signs of the last days, and there will be in the coming years, many spiritual casualties. Below are seventy-seven principles, from the Quran and from the sunna of our Prophet (SAWS) that will aid the Muslim in restoring and maintaining steadiness in his or her life. If you are experiencing instability in your life; then practicing these principles will help you in sha Allah.

  1. If at all possible, be married not single
  2. Honor your parents
  3. Teach your children the right way to behave.
  4. Always speak the truth, even if it is bitter
  5. Establish prayer
  6. Always observe the month of Ramadan.
  7. Do not compromise religious principles for monetary gain.
  8. Maintain good character
  9. Establish order in your home.
  10. Pay your zakaat dutifully
  11. Make Hajj when you are able
  12. Learn your religion
  13. Don’t make excuses for not for fulfilling your obligations
  14. Be kind to your neighbors
  15. Honor your guests
  16. Be fair and just in your dealings
  17. Speak kindly to your spouse
  18. Pay off your debts
  19. Get an education.
  20. Remember your Lord much and mention his name throughout the day.
  21. Take time out for your family
  22. Take time out for yourself
  23. Take care of your health
  24. Keep your religion simple and don’t make it complicated
  25. Do not make prohibited what Allah has allowed
  26. Don’t worship the scholars , but take the good from them
  27. Avoid fornication and adultery like the plague
  28. Don’t waste money
  29. Do not oppress anyone, ever.
  30. Don’t waste time
  31. Maintain good relations with your relatives.
  32. Protect your children from harm.
  33. Avoid the use of profanity
  34. Say what you mean, and mean what you say.
  35. Don’t be two-faced.
  36. Be kind and benevolent to the orphans
  37. Be loyal to what you believe
  38. Avoid unlawful relationships
  39. Don’t beg for anything from anyone, except from Allah
  40. Give salaams, to those who you know, and those who don’t know.
  41. don’t be envious of what other people have, except those who have      knowledge of religion and teach it to others, and those who have money and      give it to charity
  42. Always Keep your home, your clothes, and your body clean
  43. Don’t confuse religion with culture
  44. Don’t waste food
  45. Be grateful for the things you have.
  46. Don’t be self-destructive
  47. Embrace parenting
  48. Avoid religious extremism
  49. Avoid religious sectarianism
  50. Don’t argue with people about your faith.
  51. Visit the sick
  52. Never associate partners with Allah; not ever.
  53. Stay away from intoxicants
  54. Don’t say that which you do not do.
  55. Avoid close association with unrighteous people
  56. Mind your own business
  57. Always have the right intentions.
  58. Keep observant of the Friday prayers
  59. Support Allah so that He will support you
  60. Avoid complaining too much
  61. Find content in what Allah has given you
  62. Look to those who have less than you do; not to those who have more      than you do.
  63. Stay close to the masaajid
  64. Be a part of a Muslim community that has an imam
  65. Trust in Allah in all of your affairs
  66. Always observe cleanliness and the principles of Muslim hygiene
  67. Be proud of your faith
  68. Give sincere advice and be willing to take it from others.
  69. Avoid religious innovation
  70. Be consistent.
  71. Don’t let your children rule your home
  72. Always be present at the two Eids
  73. Embrace islamic spirituality according to the sunna
  74. Accept Islam totally without pre-conditions
  75. Be sincere in your worship
  76. Love the Prophet (SAWS), and send salutations upon him (SAWS).
  77. Love the righteous, and give them respect.

 Imam Luqman Ahmad

Shaykh Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad, a Philadelphia native, is a writer, a researcher, associate Imam and resident scholar at Toledo Masjid al-Islam in Toledo, Ohio. He is a former executive committee member of the North America Imams Federation (NAIF). He is also and the author of the book, “Double Edged Slavery“, a critical and authoritative look at the condition of African American and convert Muslims in the United States, and the book: “The Devil’s Deception of the Modern Day Salafi Sect “, a critical look at the ideological underpinning of modern Salafist extremism. He blogs at imamluqman.wordpress.com, and can be reached at imamabulaith@yahoo.com.

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