Black American Muslims, Different but Equal. By Imam Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad

Look, there is no such thing as a black version of Islam that’s still Islam. Black Muslims, converts, reverts, or any other vert, are obligated to submit to Islam, period. The same goes for any other Muslim people on the face of the Earth. Every Muslim people of every land, race and nationality has their own problems and dysfunctions that can be remedied or improved by obeying Allah and His Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم which is the operable definition of Islam.

Black American Muslims are no different. Our history is specific like everyone else’s histories are specific, and Islam as we practice it ma appear different to some because we are a different people, and a new Muslim civilization. However, by no means are Black American Muslims, descendants of slaves, or White American or Latino American Muslims to craft a new version of Islam that is inconsistent with the Divine Revelation revealed to Al-Mustapha صلى الله عليه وسلم. True, we are a new, nuanced civilization (mostly converts) with our own history, culture and situational reality, but we are still beholden to the same Lord, and the same Book as all Muslims, and we are a legitimate part of the global Ummah of Islam, whether anyone agrees with that or not, and regardless whether any of the world’s Muslims accept that it not. We are part of this Ummah of Muhammad صلى الله عليه وسلم but we occupy our own neglected corner of it.

Allah has made for each emerging Muslim people, their own history, circumstances, and path to Him be He Exalted and Glorified. That is by His Wisdom, and His divine decreel. We have to trek own own path in a religion that we share with the rest of the Muslim world, and we don’t need or seek anyone’s permission. However, it cannot occur as a mob, nor as a people who limit themselves and their potential by the color of their skin. Let that sink in.

-imam Abu Laith Luqman ibn Abdul-Karim Muhammad Ahmad.

imamabulaith@yahoo.com

RANKING AND STATIONING IN THE RELIGION OF ISLAM. منازل و طبقات فى دين الإسلام, by Shaykh Luqman Ahmad

Pylex 5-Steps Steel Stair Stringer black 7-1/2 in. x 10-1/4 in. (Includes 1 Stair Riser), Black baked powder coating

If you’re one of those Muslims who only woke up yesterday to what’s going on in Muslim America, or a novice Muslim activist, then  you don’t get to come in on the ground floor and pontificate to people what’s what, like you’ve mastered the terrain, all the while you’re just joining the party. You can’t do that on the street, in a board room, in a classroom or anywhere else. Nobody starts out at the top. Be a student, before you try to be a teacher. Be a follower before you try to be a leader. Stay in your lane, and wait your turn. Social media places everyone at the same level. The opinion of a complete idiot is often given the same credence and certainly the same airtime as that of a seasoned veteran, or an expert. although this is the new version of Muslim equality for some. This is not exactly the way it works.

Ranking is part of the religion of Islam. Everybody Muslim should know that, especially those who make a lot of noise. According to Islamic morality laws, each person deserves their dignity because that is the Sunna, and that is justice. However, we respect our elders, we respect knowledge and experience, we respect our Imams and our scholars, we respect time in the struggle and we respect those men and women who carried this religion, sacrificed and held it down before us. This is all part of the deen of Islam. We should have learned this by now.

These are important lessons for Muslims, not only do these lessons have to be taught, especially to our youth, again and again, these principles need to be actualized if we are to survive as a Muslim civilization. These parts of the Sunna are one of the most effective ways of countering mobism.

Imam Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad

Shaykh Luqman Ahmad is an associate Imam an the Toledo Masjid al-Islam. The statements and sentients of this article are his own and does not represent any organization he is associated with.

The imam can be reached at imamabulaith@yahoo.com

What American Muslims Need to Understand about America, by Imam Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad

“America is more than what many Muslims think of her. I’m not blind to her faults but it is wrong to believe that our country and our history is without virtue’. — Imam Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad

These are the United States of America, and I respect the right of every American to have his or her own opinion, and to speak their mind. The Prophet (SAWS) said: “Amongst those receiving the most severe punishment on the Day of Judgment, is the two faced person. The one who goes to one group bearing a face, and to another group bearing another face“.

Speaking of having your own opinion, I personally do not like it when people immigrate to America, benefit immensely from what our country has to offer, make a few dollars, buy a house in the suburbs, and then starts trashing our country saying that America does not live up to their expectations. I’m not knocking anyone for expressing their views or criticisms. I’m talking about the one who completely trashes everything about our country and insinuates that there is no good here and thesis just an awful evil place. That’s just my personal opinion, and some of you may have your own opinions about my opinion and that’s your right. There’s no need for anyone to be offended, to be in a tizzy, or to unleash upon me a tirade of indignation. However, you can if you want to, just try not to make it personal. If you have a problem with my previous statement, then you’ll probably feel some kind of way about what I’m about to say next. Especially those to whom it applies.

New American Muslims as well as those born here should stop complaining so much about their country and perhaps use the freedom and liberty afforded to us as American citizens to to ask the hard questions about how we practice Islam outside the din of polemical debate, political rhetoric, and public relations considerations.

Immigrant dominated national Islamic political and advocacy groups particularly, as a new class of Muslim activists — while advancing the argument that American Muslims are as American as apple pie — demonstrate in many ways, especially in the way they confront islamophobia, that they do not quite understand America.

While declaring that the principle cause of islamophobia (a term that I do not agree with) is that Americans do not understand Muslims and Islam, there needs to be a parallel acknowledgment by American Muslim immigrants, and anyone else who supports such an oversimplified, nonsensical notion, that there are lots of things they need to understand about America, and Americans whose acceptance they crave.

There is hardly any other personal liberty dearer to us than the right of every individual to speak his or her mind and to have our own personal views or opinions. To put it simply, we do not like being told what to think, or who we can like or dislike, or which religious group we can or cannot talk about. In America, if someone talks negatively about Christians, the whole of Christian America does not come down on them. It doesn’t elicit a nationwide, multi-denominational Christian rebuke, nor does it catapult the matter onto the American Christian agenda as the suggested topic for next Sunday’s sermon. That’s just not the way we do things in this country. Jews are criticized just as much as Muslims and are probably the most parodied religious group in America. The whole Jewish nation does not come down on every alleged anti-Semite, or scour the news hunting down people’s campaign worthy biases. Even if some Jews address it or some organizations say something (and that’s a big if), it doesn’t become a nationwide rabbinical campaign.

However, if someone, especially a prominent person or politician says something about Muslims, or God forbid articulates what Muslims activists believe to be an islamophobic sentiment, Muslim advocacy organizations capitalize on it and feeds it to the Muslim community as a campaign worthy issue, and from there it wafts into our nations mosques. That’s not cool. Not cool at all. If someone talks about Muslims, the whole Muslim community should not come down on them. That’s so freakin un-American.

When some people in our country demonized Muhammad Ali, he withstood it with dignity, now he is loved by some of those same folks. We excoriated al-Hajj Malik Shabazz (Malcolm X), he withstood our criticism and we ended up making a movie about him. We said bad things about the Mormons. They withstood it and got their own state. I could go on and on but the point is, no one in the history of the United States has succeeded in silencing their critics simply by complaining and calling them bigots, racists, islamophobes, nigger-lovers, or any other verbal counter-punch.

With all the degreed and advance degreed professionals we have in the American Muslim advocacy department, it should be well understood that American Muslims will never succeed in shutting down all criticism of Islam and Muslims in America. We love that freedom of speech clause in the constitution and we’re not going to give it up. Even though some people may hold their tongue just to avoid the drama, Americans will continue to think and believe as we please, and there is nothing that anyone can do about it. For every so-called islamophobe who cowers, or is silenced though bribery, professional censure or public pressure, another one pops up under the radar; in part due to the censure of the former. Some Muslims are still responding to statements made by Donald Trump more than three weeks ago.

During his Farewell Sermon, the Prophet (SAWS) re-emphasized Islam’s moral stance against racial and ethnic prejudice, and never once mentioned that we should concern ourselves with public image, chasing after peoples’ negative statements, or seeking acceptance of the people. What a pathetic irony, that more than 1400 years after the Prophet’s last sermon, some American Muslims find themselves obsessed with the image of Islam, having to challenge every act of bigotry, and getting approval of the people, while almost completely ignoring our own debilitating racial, and ethnic prejudices that violate the moral code of our religion, and fuel the negative images of Islam and Muslims, that we find ourselves so obsessed with. [Originally written three years ago, I’ve made some slight edits from the original]

— Imam Luqman Ahmad

Epilogue: So what do you suggest we do Imam? Answer: I suggest that we shift from responding to things politically to responding according to the dictates of our scriptures (Quran and Sunna). Simply put, we need to shift from political Islam to the religion of Islam and understand that they are not entirely the same. Yes, politics is a part of our religion, however, politics should be subordinate to religion, not the other way around. As Muslims we need to be more concerned with obeying Allah, and following the Prophet than we are with obeying our egos, and following our political action handbooks. It’s that simple. More on this later. In the meantime, God bless the United States of America.

American born Luqman Ahmad is a life long Sunni Muslim, the son of converts to Islam. He is a writer, consultant, patriot, and has been the Imam of a Northern California mosque for twenty years. He is a former executive committee member of the North America Imams Federation, a founding member of COSVIO, (the Council of Sacramento Valley Islamic Organizations), and the author of the book “The Devils Deception of the Modern day Salafiyyah Sect”, a detailed look at salafiyyism the ideology which forms the mindset of ISIS. He has written blog posts challenging ISIS, Anwar Awlaki, and BOKO Haram on his blog, imamluqman.wordpress.com. The sentiments shared in this article are his own and not representative of any of his professional affiliations. He can be reached at imamluqman@masjidibrahim.com

These are the United States of America, and I respect the right of every American to have his or her own opinion, and to speak their mind. The Prophet (SAWS) said: “Amongst those receiving the most severe punishment on the Day of Judgment, is the two faced person. The one who goes to one group bearing a face, and to another group bearing another face“.

Speaking of having your own opinion, I personally do not like it when people immigrate to America, benefit immensely from what our country has to offer, make a few dollars, buy a house in the suburbs, and then starts trashing our country saying that America does not live up to their expectations. I’m not knocking anyone for expressing their views or criticisms. I’m talking about the one who completely trashes everything about our country and insinuates that there is no good here and this is just an awful evil place. That’s just my personal opinion, and some of you may have your own opinions about my opinion and that’s your right.

There’s no need for anyone to be offended, to be in a tizzy, or to unleash upon me a tirade of indignation. However, you can if you want to, just try not to make it personal. If you have a problem with my previous statement, then you’ll probably feel some kind of way about what I’m about to say next. Especially those to whom it applies.

New American Muslims should stop complaining so much about their new country and perhaps use the freedom and liberty afforded to them as American citizens to to ask the hard questions about how we practice Islam outside the din of polemical debate, political rhetoric, and public relations considerations. Immigrant dominated national Islamic political and advocacy groups as well as the new class of Muslim activists — while advancing the argument that American Muslims are as American as apple pie — demonstrate in many ways, especially in the way they confront islamophobia, that they do not quite understand America.

While declaring that the principle cause of islamophobia (a term that I do not agree with) is that Americans do not understand Muslims and Islam, there needs to be a parallel acknowledgment by American Muslim immigrants, and anyone else who supports such an oversimplified, nonsensical notion, that there are lots of things they need to understand about America, and Americans, whose acceptance they crave.

There is hardly any other personal liberty dearer to us than the right of every individual to speak his or her mind and to have our own personal views or opinions. To put it simply, as Americans, we do not like being told what to think, or who we can like or dislike, or which religious group we can or cannot talk about. In America, if someone talks negatively about Christians, the whole of Christian America does not come down on them. It doesn’t elicit a nationwide, multi-denominational Christian rebuke, nor does it catapult the matter onto the American Christian agenda as the suggested topic for next Sunday’s sermon. That’s just not the way we do things in this country. Jews are criticized just as much as Muslims and are probably the most parodied religious group in America. The whole Jewish nation does not come down on every alleged anti-Semite, or scour the news hunting down people’s campaign worthy biases. Even if some Jews address it or some organizations say something (and that’s a big if), it doesn’t become a nationwide rabbinical campaign.

However, if someone, especially a prominent person or politician says something about Muslims, or God forbid articulates what Muslims activists believe to be an islamophobic sentiment, Muslim advocacy organizations capitalize on it and feeds it to the Muslim community as a campaign, worthy of national obsession, and from there it wafts into our nations mosques. That’s not cool. Not cool at all. If someone talks about Muslims, the whole Muslim community should not come down on them. That’s un-American in my book.

When some people in our country demonized Muhammad Ali, he withstood it with dignity, now his memory is revered by many of those same folks. We excoriated al-Hajj Malik Shabazz (Malcolm X), he withstood our criticism and we ended up making a movie about him. We said bad things about the Mormons. They withstood it and got their own state lol. I could go on and on but the point is, no one in the history of the United States has succeeded in silencing their critics simply by complaining and calling them bigots, racists, islamophobes, nigger-lovers, or any other verbal counter-punch.

With all the degreed and advance degreed professionals we have in the American Muslim advocacy department, it should be well understood that American Muslims will never succeed in shutting down all criticism of Islam and Muslims in America. We love that freedom of speech clause in the constitution and we’re not going to give it up. Even though some people may hold their tongue just to avoid the drama, Americans will continue to think and believe as we please, and there is nothing that anyone can do about it. For every so-called islamophobe who cowers, or is silenced though bribery, professional censure or public pressure, another one pops up under the radar; in part due to the censure of the former. Some Muslims are still responding to statements made by Donald Trump more than three weeks ago.

During his Farewell Sermon, the Prophet (SAWS) re-emphasized Islam’s moral stance against racial and ethnic prejudice, and never once mentioned that we should concern ourselves with public image, chasing after peoples’ negative statements, or seeking acceptance of the people. What a pathetic irony, that more than 1400 years after the Prophet’s last sermon, some American Muslims find themselves obsessed with the image of Islam, having to challenge every act of bigotry, and getting approval of the people, while almost completely ignoring our own debilitating racial, and ethnic prejudices that violate the moral code of our religion, and fuel the negative images of Islam and Muslims, that we find ourselves so obsessed with.

— Imam Luqman Ahmad

Epilogue: So what do you suggest we do Imam? Answer: I suggest that we shift from responding to things politically to responding according to the dictates of our scriptures (Quran and Sunna). Simply put, we need to shift from political Islam to the religion of Islam and understand that they are not entirely the same. Yes, politics is a part of our religion, however, politics should be subordinate to religion, not the other way around. As Muslims we need to be more concerned with obeying Allah, and following the Prophet than we are with obeying our egos, and following our political action handbooks. It’s that simple. More on this later. In the meantime, God bless the United States of America.

American born Luqman Ahmad is a life long Sunni Muslim, the son of converts to Islam. He is a writer, consultant, patriot, and associate Imam at the Toledo Masjid al-Islam. He is a former executive committee member of the North America Imams Federation, a founding member of COSVIO, (the Council of Sacramento Valley Islamic Organizations), and the author of the book “The Devils Deception of the Modern day Salafiyyah Sect”, a detailed look at modern-day salafiyyism. The sentiments shared in this article are his own and not representative of any of his professional affiliations or of the Toledo Masjid al-Islam . He can be reached at imamabulaith@yahoo.com

ARE WE COMMITTED TO SUCCESS? OR COMMITTED TO FAILURE? By Imam Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad

Where are we going wrong here? It seems like some of us are absolutely committed to self-hate, to jelousy, to ignorance, to championing every cause but our own, to unlawful relationships, to tearing down our leaders, to divorce as the go to option in marraiage, to gender war between the sexes, to making up new forms of Islam, to abandoning scripture, to not being committed to anything, to individualism, to lack of sacrifice, to selfishness, to disobedience to Allah, to sitting on the fence, to not following hadith, to thinking like we’re still slaves, and to attacking those of us who stand on the front lines.

By Allah, I just don’t understand sometimes. What is so wrong about simply doing what’s right best you can? What is so wrong about being honest? What’s so wrong about being poor until you can do better? What’s so wrong about being wealthy but generous and not brag about it? What is so wrong about being loyal? What is so wrong about spending money in the cause of Allah? What is so wrong about imams cooperating for the common good? What’s so wrong about people getting together to form communities? What’s so wrong about not being slick? What’s so wrong about people just being regular Muslims? What’s so wrong about men and women having honor? What’s so wrong about staying out of other people’s business?

What’s so wrong about keeping covenants with the Lord? What’s so wrong about respecting our elders? What’s so wrong about having teachers from our own? Why do we have to innovate in religion? Why do we have to invent new forms of Islam? Why? I just don’t get it. What’s so wrong with the simple Islam of the Prophet (SAWS)? What’s so wrong about sharing our resources? What’s so wrong about empowering our leaders so that they can do better? What’s so wrong with repentance? What’s so wrong with men acting like men and women acting like women? Its like so many of us just want to be stuck on a fence, in the middle of nowhere. We’ve been virtually stuck as an ummah for the last 60 years. 

The Prophet (SAWS) said: “All of my ummah shall enter paradise except those who refuse. (They asked) who would refuse O Messenger of Allah? He replied; “whoever obeys me shall enter paradise, and whoever disobeys me, has refused”.

Imam Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad is Associate Imam at Masjid al-Islam in Toledo Ohio.

CHASING ASS AND RUNNING GAME? Y’ALL GOT US TWISTED.. by Imam Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad

It is very difficult for an outsider to understand the challenges and dynamics of Black American Muslim manhood, marriages, and family issues in inner-city America and more specifically, Muslim America, unless you come from the places that we come from. The breakdown and failure of the Black American Muslim family and with it, our religious communities in these inner-city plantations that we live on is usually attributed to the inadequacy or failure of the Black Muslim man. Full stop.

That is the go to narrative, and the standardized fall-back position, and we, as Black Muslim men, are used to that. We live with being demonized, with being the objects of scorn, and some of us even accept that notion. However, that characterization does not tell the true story nor the whole story. The only ones that truly know our story, is us, and those of our women who are awake.

Out of thousands upon thousands of black American Muslim men that I know personally, it has never been the stated intention of any of them to abandon our women or our children or our people. We don’t even talk like that. True, many us us have given up, but not all of us. Not by a long shot.

As husbands, fathers, stepfathers, prisoners, ex-cons, intellectuals, professionals, foot soldiers, and imams and amirs of past snd present, we’ve taken on the full dose of generational trauma, slavery in all its forms, a history of abuse, abandonment, addiction, altered psychology, pent up emotional baggage and everything else that comes with our women and children who are products, like ourselves of the lifestyle of jaahiliyya that exists in the controlled plantations that we live in.

We know who we are, and we know who our women are, better than any outside Shaykh, scholar, imam, or layperson would ever know. We take on our women, our children, our failures, and our successes (when not stolen) despite our history, despite the challenges, and despite overwhelming odds and make a go of it as husbands, as Fathers, as stepfathers, as uncle’s, as mentors, as activists, as providers, as teachers as imams, amirs. Why do we do it?

We do it because of Allah. We do it out of faith, and out the belief that through Islam things can work. And because no one else is going to do it for us. And It’s not all about chasing ass and running game like people say. Perhaps for some little boy men it is, but not the bulk of us. Y’all got us twisted.

I married a sister who had four children when I was barely 22 years old. Although I loved her, and she was a good wife, and I think I was a good husband, it did not work out. However, it was not before I was able to teach my wife, and her children some of the Islam that I knew, and those children are grown today with their own Muslim children by the grace of Allah. My last wife had six children when I married her. Overall during my lifetime I’ve helped raise at least 19 children who were not my biological children and have mentored dozens more. For some of them, I am the only father that they have ever known. And this is not rare at all. I’m not thr only Muslim man who’s done this. I might not have been the perfect dad or step dad, but I paid bills, they were safe in my care, and no one will say otherwise..

Black American Muslim men have taken on much more than we will ever be given credit for and quite frankly we aren’t looking for credit. We don’t talk about everything that we do because if you are not of our world, it’s really none of your damn business. But we do take on marriages with hurt, traumatized, broken and sometimes halfway crazy women and everything that they come with. I mean everything. And they take us on too, knowing that many times it’s going to be an uphill battle because of our circumstances, and because of our history. Why? Because we have faith in Allah, and we have faith in our women who demonstrate faith.

When we see our women struggling, or abandoned, we take on the task of looking for answers and plugging leaks even though we ourselves are struggling. We take on other men’s children who themselves many times have been abused, traumatized, neglected, abandoned, and even taken away from their mother in her previous life. Sometimes we know the details, and sometimes we don’t. Sometimes we don’t ask the questions because we already know the answers to those questions.

We’ve taken on these responsibilities because we believe in Allah, we believe in Islam, and we believed for a long time that Islam will point us at solutions if we follow our laws. We’ve learned by our own experiences that it is a little bit more complicated than that. it’s not like we had a civilizational handbook on how to survive as Black American Muslim men in this corrupt, rigged, racist, feminized system that we live in.

We are an entirely new and different civilization of Muslims, in a situational reality unlike an faced by a previous Muslim people. The last thing we need is somebody from the outside trying to play Monday morning quarterback, sometimes not even knowing the game, the language of the plantation, or who we are in reality. so unless you have something concrete and beneficial to offer us at this juncture, stay off our backs. And that goes for you women too, who are still under the spell. And by the way, I’m single, unattached and quite marriage-worthy.

The beginning. Imam Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad.

Shaykh Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad, a veteran 20 plus year Imam, is an Associate Imam and Director of Islamic education at Masjid al-Islam in Toledo Ohio. He is a Philadelphia native, a writer, a former executive committee member of the North America Imams Federation (NAIF), and the CEO of ‘Mosque Without Borders’, an organization that addresses American Muslim issues in the United States.

He is also and the author of the book, “Double Edged Slavery“, a objective and authoritative look at the condition of African American and convert Muslims in the United States, and the book: “The Devil’s Deception of the Modern Day Salafi Sect “, a critical look at the ideological underpinning of modern Salafist extremism. The views expressed in this article are his own. He blogs at imamluqman.wordpress.com, and can be reached at imamabulaith@yahoo.com.

Understanding American Muslim Frontline Imams, by Imam Luqman Ahmad.

In Muslim America , frontline Imams are first responders. We don’t get to retreat, play hooky or play hide and go seek. Many of us do not even get to retire in this life. Most of us are here for the duration, and are accessible in the Masajid, as well as online. We show up, year in year out. Jum’ah after Jum’ah, Ramadan after Ramadan and Eid after Eid. We are the shields as well as the lightening rods of the Ummah, at least here in the United States. Through the good, and the bad, we are still here. Sometimes the same people who paise us one day are the same ones excoriating us the next day. Sometimes we may appear on stage but mostly we are in the trenches, or somewhere in the crevices where people are suffering. Sometimes we are suffering too but we remain on the frontline. And when we regain our strength, we continue to move forward.

Frontline Imams are often the easiest to praise as well as the easiest to blame because we are amongst the most visible of the Muslims. We stand on the minbaars of America, and deliver the weekly messages our words are often the recorded by the public, and we are generally held to a higher standard than other Muslims. Yet, we are just as human as the rest. The veterans amongst us understand that reality and accept it as part of our covenant. Sometimes the same people who paise us one day are the same ones excoriating us the next day.

American Muslim frontline Imams, especially the outspoken from amongst us, take tremendous risks in upholding the truth. There are amongst us those who have been attacked, persecuted, left unemployed, rendered homeless and even killed as a result of owning their words, and upholding the truth. But ultimately the risks are a art of hat we inherited and we are here to serve, guard our ideological borders , and as leaders and teachers of scripture. We are answerable to our flocks, to our Lord and to the Ummah in general. We should not be left alone to advocate on the field of struggle without support from the people to whom we are shields for them.

A lot is expected from American Muslim frontline Imams, we are a minority within a minority within a minority. And it is your right to hold your Imams accountable as long as your are accountable to them to some degree. However our Imams should not be punching bags for the attached or the unattached of our Ummah. The Prophet صلى الله عليه و سلم said, “the best of your imams are those whom you love them, and they love you. You pray for them, and they pray for you. And the worst of them are those whom you hate them and they hate you. You curse them, and they curse you”. [Collected by Muslim].

We are here for the Muslims through thick and thin, and it will always be important for the Muslims that they are here for us when needed. My name is Imam Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad, you can support me through Cash App to $abulaith1. Or through my Facebook page, and f course through your prayer.

Shaykh Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad, a veteran 20 plus year Imam, is an Associate Imam at Masjid al-Islam in Toledo Ohio. He is a Philadelphia native, a writer, a former executive committee member of the North America Imams Federation (NAIF), and the CEO of ‘Mosque Without Borders’, an organization that address Muslim issues in the United States. 

He is also and the author of the book, “Double Edged Slavery“, a objective and authoritative look at the condition of African American and convert Muslims in the United States, and the book: “The Devil’s Deception of the Modern Day Salafi Sect “, a critical look at the ideological underpinning of modern Salafist extremism. The views expressed in this article are his own. He blogs at imamluqman.wordpress.com, and can be reached at imamabulaith@yahoo.com.

THE MUSLIM ANTI-WHITE SUPREMACY SURGE: WHO’S IN CHARGE? By Imam Luqman Ahmad

The Black American Muslim paper tiger campaign against white supremacy seems to have no Islamic ideological anchor. Our unbridled undisciplined hatred for a loosely defined “white supremacy” is such that it only took moments for us to condemn an 18 year old black man who forgave his brothers killer.

Interestingly enough, the people whom we As Black Americans seem to express the most admiration for, are people most accepted and invested in the system of white supremacy that we claim to abhor. The professional athletes, the entertainers, the movie stars, the wealthy, the worldly accomplished, the ostentatious, and the carefree. These are the types of people we cheer on and who benefit the most from our attention, duration and hard earned earned dollars. On the other hand the prayerful, the virtuous, the scripturally faithful, and the obedient of God, are honored in our scriptures but marginalized here on the ground with our blessing. We strive to be as much as we can inline with the system of white supremacy as we can. Our (black people’s ) attitudes towards marriage, towards alternative sexual lifestyle, definitions of success, and our declining morality alone, support the system of white supremacy. Muslims should know better.

As Americans we are accustomed to knowing who and what organizations are at the head of or are committed to issue campaigns whether it is global warning, the me too movement, occupy wall street, anti-tobacco, anti-vaping, pro-abortion, pro-life, black lives matter, Christian conservatism, seat belt laws (back in the day), civil rights, prison reform and a host of other domestic issues mitigated for or against in American past and current history.

Muslims who have found a sudden obsession with white supremecy have failed to show any new light on the matter, and have shown nothing more as far as I can see than just saying that they are against white supremacy.
No strategy, no definable leadership on the issue, no traceable origin of how it suddenly has become vogue amongst some Muslim activists or a bonifide Islamic position on it’s level of priority with regards to our situational reality. There has not even been a single public conference (in my knowledge) on stratagem and the way forward in the campaign against white supremacy. Just a slogan and that’s all. Coupled by copious expressions of hatred and unbridled emotionalism.That’s a heck of a way to run a campaign about an issue people deem so important.

In their campaigns against oppression, Harriet Tubman, Yaasir Arafat, Omar Mukhtar, Martin Luther King, Cesar Chavez, Randall Robinson, Nelson Mandala, and even our beloved Prophet صلى الله عليه و سلم all operated with some form of articulated strategy, chain of command, and operational methodology. Muslims who position opposition to White supremacy as an issue that Black American Muslims need to place at the top of our to do list, need a little more than emotional sloganeering to make an actionable case.

Shaykh Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad, a veteran 20 plus year Imam, is an Associate Imam at Masjid al-Islam in Toledo Ohio. He is a Philadelphia native, a writer, a former executive committee member of the North America Imams Federation (NAIF), and the CEO of ‘Mosque Without Borders’, an organization that address Muslim issues in the United States. 

He is also and the author of the book, “Double Edged Slavery“, a objective and authoritative look at the condition of African American and convert Muslims in the United States, and the book: “The Devil’s Deception of the Modern Day Salafi Sect “, a critical look at the ideological underpinning of modern Salafist extremism. The views expressed in this article are his own. He blogs at imamluqman.wordpress.com, and can be reached at imamabulaith@yahoo.com.

Racial Double Standard Politics In Muslim America, by Imam Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad

If American Muslim immigrants want to really champion white supremacy then those same Muslím leaders who condemn Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, need to condemn Arab supremacy and the historical ill treatment of Black American Muslims by American Muslim immigrants. When we see that kind of courage from immigrant Muslim leaders and pundits, then maybe we’ll take their opposition to racism seriously. Until then, as far as I’m concerned, the passionately articulated opposition of immigrant talking heads to racism and white supremacy rings hollow.

Prime Minister Trudeau can apologize for Black face, then how come there is no apology from American Muslim immigrant leaders, scholars, politicians and talking heads for anti-black racism perpetrated in Muslim America, at topic that is still largely taboo? Of course every immigrant Muslim of Arab, or Asian descent is not a racist. On the contrary, there are immigrant Muslim of all nationalities and ethnicities who abhor racial bigotry and who have even been victims of it. However, the culture of racial bigotry and marginalization of Black American Muslims in Muslim America, is undeniable. I stand by my words. – Imam Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad

Shaykh Abu Laith Luqman Ahmad, a veteran 20 plus year Imam, is an Associate Imam at Masjid al-Islam in Toledo Ohio. He is a Philadelphia native, a writer, a former executive committee member of the North America Imams Federation (NAIF), and the CEO of ‘Mosque Without Borders’, an organization that address Muslim issues in the United States.

He is also and the author of the book, “Double Edged Slavery“, a objective and authoritative look at the condition of African American and convert Muslims in the United States, and the book: “The Devil’s Deception of the Modern Day Salafi Sect “, a critical look at the ideological underpinning of modern Salafist extremism. The views expressed in this article are his own. He blogs at imamluqman.wordpress.com, and can be reached at imamabulaith@yahoo.com.

A SPECIAL NOTE TO OUR INDIGENOUS AMERICAN MUSLIM SISTERS, FROM IMAM LUQMAN AHMAD

I have seen, heard from and spoken to many extremely smart and intelligent Muslim women who still believe and champion the Book, the Sunna, the beliefs of Islam, and what was revealed to the Prophet صلى الله عليه و سلم. Some of you have expressed frustration and a sense of helplessness because so much is coming at us. But you’ve also expressed faith on this and other social media. As a man, as a Muslim and as an Imam, I’ve been listening to you and although I don’t understand everything, I understand a lot in Sha Allah.

I will fight to the end against the oppression of our women and for your rights in our faith according to Allah. That is my promise. However, I need you to fight on your side, against the ideological onslaught of false and corrupt beliefs, lifestyle, and heresy, creeping in on the women’s side. Some of you are very capable, knowledgable of our faith and organized. You are primed to engage with us in the struggle. I need those of you who are willing, and able, to step up. I will support you and help best I can in Sha Allah. 

They want Muslim men and women to fight separately and against each other. That was the purpose of injecting feminism and the gender wars into our community. However, that is not the way Allah wants. They want us to be enemies. Allah wants us to be allies. Read.

وَالْمُؤْمِنُونَ وَالْمُؤْمِنَاتُ بَعْضُهُمْ أَوْلِيَاءُ بَعْضٍ ۚ يَأْمُرُونَ بِالْمَعْرُوفِ وَيَنْهَوْنَ عَنِ الْمُنكَرِ وَيُقِيمُونَ الصَّلَاةَ وَيُؤْتُونَ الزَّكَاةَ وَيُطِيعُونَ اللَّهَ وَرَسُولَهُ ۚ أُولَٰئِكَ سَيَرْحَمُهُمُ اللَّهُ ۗ إِنَّ اللَّهَ عَزِيزٌ حَكِيمٌ

[The believing men and believing women are allies of one another. They enjoin what is right and forbid what is wrong and establish prayer and give zakah and obey Allah and His Messenger. Those – Allah will have mercy upon them. Indeed, Allah is Exalted in Might and Wise.] 9:71 

It’s not going to be easy, but we have to start somewhere. Feel free to inbox me with your ideas if you like, or we can speak and discuss publicly. Not looking to argue with anyone. Just tryna do my job. 

Respectfully, Imam Luqman Ahmad

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